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CF Mirroring Flash Media

High end digital SLR cameras use two compact flash slots to record duplicate images during photo sessions.  The idea is to provide a backup in the event the media goes bad, gets corrupted or the misplaced by the photographer.
 
 
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Exceria Pro From Toshiba is New CF Card Format – Ultra Fast

Toshiba announced the launch of a new line CompactFlash (CF) memory cards, the Exceria Pro series, specifically targeting the DSLR (digital single less reflex) market. The new cards will be compatible with CF revision 6.0 and will offer performance even higher than XQD format, previously developed by Nikon and Sony and is a proprietary format. The initial line-up of 16GB, 32GB, 64GB cards will come to market Q2 2013 and offer the world’s highest level read (up to 160MB/s) and write (up to 150MB/s) speeds. Exceria Pro will position Toshiba to meet the demands of the high-end DSLR market, including high resolution image capture, sustained continuous shooting, HD video recording and high speed data transfers to other devices. Fully compliant with UDMA7 high speed interface anyone using with high speed DSLRs or video with VPG-20 standards will benefit from this increased speed format. Interestingly the CF market is going to increase up to 50% between now and 2015.  In addition, this might be the perfect high speed card to use with our previous post, the Nexcopy CF Duplicator. Continue Reading

CF Duplicator – Press Release – New from Nexcopy Inc.

LAKE FOREST, Calif.–Nexcopy Inc., a leading manufacturer in USB Duplicator solutions, announces their all new CF Duplicator system for data loading to Compact Flash cards. “Coupling the power of Nexcopy’s Drive Manager software and the new CF duplicator design our system can handle any configuration requirement by contract manufacturers or fulfillment houses”
  • CF Duplicator with all new design
  • Deep CF sockets with guides for easy insert and removal
  • CF Duplicator available in 15, 30 and 45 target systems
  • Powerful duplicator software with many advanced features
  • Unique data may be copied to each card
Nexcopy is announcing the all new design of our CF duplicator solutions. These robust and reliable CF duplicator systems are available in 15 socket, 30 socket and 45 socket configurations. The new CF Duplicators by Nexcopy Company are designed with functionality and ergonomics in mind. With top loading CF sockets in combination with deep rail guides to easily insert and remove CF media the new system will virtually eliminate bent pins from high volume duplication of CF media. “Coupling the power of Nexcopy’s Drive Manager software and the new CF duplicator design our system can handle any configuration requirement by contract manufacturers or fulfillment houses,” reports Greg Morris, President of Nexcopy. “The system is PC based and provides tools such as duplication from IMG files, unique data streaming to each socket, network connectivity and rich Graphical User Interface for performance feedback and log reporting.” All CF duplicators can copy from an archive IMG file, from a physical master device and include binary bit by bit verification functions. These systems are ideal for bootable CF cards. The new CF Duplicators by Nexcopy.com are available for immediate purchase with a starting price of Continue Reading

XQD Is A New Compact Flash Specification

The Compact Flash Association introduced a new standard recently.  The standard was release because CF media continues to get press from high performing SD cards where most camera manufacturers are favoring.  I suspect the SD format is more inviting because of the smaller form factor.  Well this is where the XQD spec address’ that issue.

Key features of the XQD format include: a 38.5mm by 29.9mm by 3.8mm optimized size format, greater durability, scalable high performance interface, based on PCI Express 2.5Gbps today and 5Gbps in the future (instead of PCMCIA used by SD cards), and actual write speed targets of 125MB/sec and higher.
“The XQD format will enable further evolution of hardware and imaging applications, and widen the memory card options available to CompactFlash users such as professional photographers,”
said Shigeto Kanda CFA chairman and Canon executive. Licensing for CFA members will start in early 2012, and no camera makers have announced plans to use the format yet. Continue Reading

What is CFast?

CFast is a variant of Compact Flash.  A traditional Compact Flash card is based off ATA or IDE bus for data transfer.  Since most CF cards are used for embedded applications, the forum was looking to increase speed.  They did this by creating CFast which is a technology based of Serial ATA bus.

What is CFast Card

This means the connector is completely different for Compact Flash cards and CFast cards.  So if you are thinking about increasing your performance of a CF card while using your traditional CF card Reader, you’ll be S.O.L.  The CFast uses a different connection type.  In addition, if you are using the CF cards for camera’s, you’ll have to get a new camera…one that supports CFast connection.  CFast cards use a 7-pin SATA data connector (identical to the standard SATA connector). The data transfer rate of CFast is about 3 times faster than Compact Flash.  So we’ve jumped from 100MB/s to about 300MB/s. Continue Reading

Recover File From Compact Flash Card

If you need to recover files from a Compact Flash card then try Flash Memory Toolkit.  This software package is a free download for most features and will perform functions like read/write benchmark tests and recover files from a flash card or flash drive.

recover file, Compact flash card

USBPerformance software will allow you to recover a file from a Compact Flash card.  This is how it works. The utility will make a binary image of your Compact Flash card…it doesn’t matter if you can’t read the data or not, it’ll still make an image file. Then the utility will mount the image file as a drive letter on your computer [PC only]. From here you can browse your content and recover that file from your Compact Flash card. In most cases, when a flash card goes bad [either CF, SD, microSD or USB] the problem or error is from the partition table or the File Allocation Table.  Since this mounting of an image gets past those issues, you can get into where the files are stored…from here you can copy them out to a normal working part of your hard drive or another removable media. Give it a go.  USB Performance website with a link directly to the file recovery page. Continue Reading

Compact Flash 5.0 Specification Breaches 144PB Capacity

The Compact Flash Organization [site] released their new 5.0 specification earlier today.  It just blew the cap off the lid of storage limits.  The current specification for Compact Flash is 137GBs…now that is 144 Petabytes, or PBs. Petabyte is a big number, and most people haven’t heard of it.  Well, to break it down, a petabyte is [around] 150 million Gigabytes. Look around your house for some Blu-ray discs, that would equal six million blu-ray titles on one Compact Flash card.  I guess that means no more RAID boxes, right?  I mean, what’s better than solid state memory and storage the size of Texas?

petabyte compact flash

We started doing the math on the time it would take a CF Duplicator to copy a 5.0 Compact Flash card, laughed and stopped.  There just isn’t technology out there for bulk data loading to a device like this…let alone finding a ligitimate use of putting that much information on the card anyway. So we don’t see a practical use for the 5.0 spec yet, but there are other improvements we should get excited about.  The CFA says Revision 5.0 brings an optional quality of service framework that guarantees a certain level of performance and prevents dropping frames, more efficient cleanup of unused space, a new electrical design that better complies with ATA standards. There’s no mention of when CompactFlash 5.0 cards will ship, but if you are still interested you can read up on the new spec here [PDF], or download the official specification for a C note. Continue Reading

45 Port CF Duplicator From Nexcopy

Nexcopy Corporation released a new line of flash memory duplication systems, the CF Duplicator 150PC, 300PC and 450PC.  These PC based systems are ideal for doing bulk data loading to Compact Flash cards.

CF Duplicator

Nexcopy has some unique features to make any data loading job a breeze.  For example, you can put unique files to each CF card through their Unique Data Copy function.  Or a user can easily copy bootable Compact Flash cards by using the bit for bit Short Image copy function.  The Short Image copy function means only the data clusters used on the CF card will be copied to the target devices…rather than the entire thing. However, Nexcopy also provides a Full Image copy function if that is required.  I’m thinking this would be good for Ext2 or Ext3 Linux formats where there are potential files that could be in any sector of the CF media. Nexcopy Inc.  CF Duplicator line starts out with the CF150PC at $1,200 with an upgrade path to the 30 port and 45 port systems.  So the CF Duplicator is modular in design. Nexcopy also mentions a user can mix and match duplicator boxes, so you could now copy to SD media, CF media and USB sticks all through one software interface, and at the same time!  Not bad. You can learn more by visiting the product page: CF Duplicator by Nexcopy. http://www.nexcopy.com/cf-duplicator/ Source: GetUSB.info. Continue Reading

Super Talent Announces New Compact Flash Cards

Super Talent is pushing out a new line of Compact Flash cards, then CFast series.  The CFast has a maximum bandwidth of 375MBs which is nearly four times faster than a traditional high end CF card at 90MBs.

CFast compact flash

The new CFast storage card breaks the speed bottleneck between the SSD and the device by using a SATA interface. Super Talent has clocked these CFast cards at up to 200MB/sec read speeds. With a Super Talent CFast storage card installed, there will be no waiting time for the camera to catch up, and it will be much swifter to view pictures on a camera or to copy them to computer. Measuring 36.4 x 42.8 x 3.3mm for Type I CFast storage cards and 36.4 x 42.8 x 5.0mm for Type II, the same physical dimensions as the CompactFlash card, the CFast Storage Card has a single-chip controller and flash memory module. The SATA interface consists of a 7-pin signal connector and a 17-pin power and control connector. The card operates at 3.3V. Super Talent is offering five different CFast storage cards, 8GB and 16GB based on SLC (Single Level Cell) flash and 8GB, 16GB and 32GB based on MLC (Multi Level Cell) flash. The first generation of CFast storage cards supports transfer speeds up to 200MB/s. Source: SuperTalent. Continue Reading

Compact Flash Uses Dual Processor For 90MB Sec Transfer Rate

dual processor CF cardYes, you read the title correct.  We now have a dual processor on Compact Flash cards.  The new SanDisk Extreme Pro clicks along at an impressive 90MB/s transfer rate. Just what the doctor ordered for the professional photographer and photo analysis equipment applications. So what does this mean for transfer rates?  Well consider a typical [high performance] CF card runs at 45MB/s write speed.  The new dual processor CF card runs [basically] twice as fast. Of course the device itself is only half the equation, you still need a host who can accept such fast speeds, such as the Canon EOS 7D or Nikon D300s dSLRs to name a few. For those who have the camera already, you might need the SanDisk Extreme Pro ExpressCard Adapter which plugs into the ExpressCard slot on laptops. Compared with typical card readers which offer up to 20MB/s transfer rates, the SanDisk adapter allows up to 90MB/s read and write speeds. The Extreme Compact Flash series is targeted at enthusiasts and available in 8GB (S$139 (US$99.43)), 16GB (S$269 (US$192.43)) and 32GB (S$399 (US$285.43)) capacities. For professional photographers who need fast, high-capacity media, the Extreme Pro comes in 16GB (S$413 (US$295.44)), 32GB (S$741 (US$530.08)) and 64GB (S$1,382 (US$988.63)) versions. The new cards are in retail stores now. Continue Reading
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