Splash in Flash Memory

Flash Memory And Their Beloved Gadgets
Flash Memory is quickly become the defacto standard for storing digital data. We will see a day when optical media and disc drives are long gone with only solid state flash memory serving up our digital dreams. Come splash in flash memory.

What is CFast?

09.28.10 | Compact Flash| Flash Memory News | Permalink

CFast is a variant of Compact Flash.  A traditional Compact Flash card is based off ATA or IDE bus for data transfer.  Since most CF cards are used for embedded applications, the forum was looking to increase speed.  They did this by creating CFast which is a technology based of Serial ATA bus.

What is CFast Card

This means the connector is completely different for Compact Flash cards and CFast cards.  So if you are thinking about increasing your performance of a CF card while using your traditional CF card Reader, you’ll be S.O.L.  The CFast uses a different connection type.  In addition, if you are using the CF cards for camera’s, you’ll have to get a new camera…one that supports CFast connection.  CFast cards use a 7-pin SATA data connector (identical to the standard SATA connector).

The data transfer rate of CFast is about 3 times faster than Compact Flash.  So we’ve jumped from 100MB/s to about 300MB/s.

Flash Memery – Where Did It Start

09.09.10 | Flash Memory News| MicroSD| Secure Digital| USB flash | Permalink

So here is a bit of information one could use for a cocktail conversation starter at your next computer club meeting, the start of flash memory.

The first piece of flash memory was invented way back in 1984.  Flash was invented by Toshiba and by a guy named Dr. Fujio Masuoka.  According to Toshiba records, the term “flash” was suggested by Dr. Masuoka’s colleague, Mr. Shoji Ariizumi because the erase process of the memory contents reminded him of a flash like in a camera.

Toshiba presented the new invention at the IEEE 1984 Integrated Electronics Devices Meeting in San Jose California and Intel saw the immediate value and jumped on board.  By 1988 the first commercial NOR type flash chip was commercially available.

NAND flash Toshiba

NOR based flash has long erase and write times and has a full address/ data interface.  Meaning one can read or write data to any portion of the NOR chip.  The NOR technology is mostly used for low levels of read/write cycles.  So for example, NOR is great for BIOS and firmware of a device.  NOR was the first version of flash, but everyone quickly realized a cheaper, faster solution is also needed.

In 1989 the first NAND flash chip was introduced.  It had faster erase and write times, higher density, and lower cost than NOR flash – with ten times the endurance. The draw back with NAND [if you can call it that] is the I/O interface only allowing sequential access to data. Meaning you can only write to the device after the last bit of data has been written.  This makes it suitable for mass-storage devices such as PC cards and various memory cards like USB, SD and microSD, and somewhat less useful for computer memory.

Source:  TutorialsWeb.